Causes of Sinus Infections

About 37 million people in america are affected by sinus infections. A sinus infection is when the very small holes which connect your nasal passages into your sinus get...

About 37 million people in america are affected by sinus infections. A sinus infection is when the very small holes which connect your nasal passages into your sinus get blocked. They’re cavities which lay beneath your eyes, nose, and lips. After the gunk obstructing them builds up, bacteria develops, and there’s a pressurized, swollen, painful feeling. The sources for the blockage are more difficult to figure out, and there are a few!

Viruses

Most sinus infections are caused by a common cold. The common cold is a virus and sadly, can’t be cured. Antibiotics are useless when it comes to curing a virus, and for that reason, you must just wait it out. Symptoms should improve after a week or so. The best way to prevent a virus is to get a flu shot, keep your hands clean, and don’t hang out with those that are afflicted by it. 

Allergies

Inflammation brought on by allergens can block the nasal passages and hinder mucous drainage. If you’re prone to allergies or suffer from hay fever, you should attempt and prevent your allergen triggers such as pollen, dust, or pet dander. Individuals with allergies and sinus infections will almost certainly suffer more extensively. OTC antihistamines and nasal sprays can help reduce and alleviate your symptoms.

Bacteria

When you’ve got a common cold for 10 or more days, it’s possible that bacteria has accumulated. Once the bacteria on your body finds the ideal environment to grow, it will do so with a vengeance. Although it’s rarely bacteria that jump-starts sinus infections, bacteria will complicate secondary infections 10 fold. Have a decongestant to help clear your passages to prevent developing bacterial sinusitis. Should you develop it, antibiotics would be the best way to go.

Polyps

Nasal polyps grow in the nose or sinus cells and are small, benign growths. They can limit your airway passages resulting in headaches and other problems. They prevent mucous drainage that may result in sinusitis. A nasal steroid spray or oral steroids are often prescribed for them, but sometimes don’t work. If they don’t work for you, you might need surgery.

Flying

If you travel a lot by air, it is possible to activate a build-up of mucous in your sinus due to the air pressure. You should take a decongestant nasal spray or inhaler before you take off to help maintain your sinus clear. 

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